Tag Archives: So Below

Book of Daemons – The Gidim Irkalla

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Jeanne of the Gidim Irkalla is perhaps too patient with her host, Marc.

The last of the Gidim to awaken, the Irkalla daemons are deeply involved with the threads of fate. More than any other build in the setting, an Irkalla host makes use of Luck, both to augment rolls and as a cost to spells. Between their ability to modify rolls with Luck Points, and their Atropos Whisper – the ability to ask the GM for specific numbers once per session – Irkalla hosts are more involved with the mechanics of the game itself than anyone. Built for players who like to meld their roleplay to their rollplay, Irkalla rewards careful mathematics and resource use.

Blessed One (11)(1)
Irkalla 21
Transfer 1 Luck Point
Barrier (Toughness Will+1)

Most Irkalla parameters are decidedly metaphysical, with supernatural polymorphs, luck transfers, and curses. This one creates a barrier, a magic shield that re-routes damage to the caster’s mana supply.

Where can you use Atropos Whisper? Well, you can do the obvious thing and ask the result of a roll, or ask a value from an opponent’s character sheet. For example, if you know your opponent barely made a roll, you can cast something like this:

Irritation (10)
Irkalla 20
Polymorph Quirk

Quirk is a catch-all trait meant to encompass any time a character would be distracted, irritated, sick, or otherwise not at their best. It gives the character -1 to all rolls in the presence of a certain trigger. If you know that your opponent is barely scraping by, guaranteeing them -1 by picking something nearby as a trigger can mean a lot.

But there are more numbers in the game than the ones you roll. How many people are in this room? How much is he willing to pay us to betray the organization? What time will the reinforcements arrive?

What is the opponent’s MCS designation?

Remember to check out the City Limits Kickstarter and to check us out on twitter at @TeamCabalGames for more updates!

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Book of Daemons – The Gidim Ishkur

Remember to check out the City Limits Kickstarter and to check us out on twitter at @TeamCabalGames for more updates!

In a good combat, a really good combat, every turn counts. Every team member’s actions need to be just right, every turn needs to give results. For some players, the minute strategy of the combat from turn to turn is all that matters, the most interesting part of the game. For them, we’ve made the Gidim Ishkur.

Gidim Ishkur hosts maintain a psychic network by investing mana in the bonds with other people. Everyone in this network can communicate telepathically, as though they were speaking aloud right next to one another, even if they’re kilometers apart. They can also share initiative in combat, trading turns to make sure the right person gets to act at the right time. Even better, they can all use any combo techs or spells the Ishkur host has spent ability points on. What’s a combo tech? Something like this:

Dance of Four
Dance 16
Combo Tech (With other combo techs on the same initiative)
Extra Attack

Dance? Really? Well, yes. Actually, as long as your GM buys your reasoning, you can make a tech out of any skill on your character sheet. Common choices include using Lie to distract an opponent, or using Convince to increase your dodge (usually titled “Not the Face”, but titles are up to you!)

Because being part of the Gidim Ishkur’s psychic network means party members can share initiative, combination abilities can go off without a hitch every time. If you need to time everything down to the second, a Gidim Ishkur host is the perfect addition to a party.

Book of Daemons – The Gidim Nergal

We’re continuing our series on the magic skills of City Limits with the Gidim Nergal, although “magic skills” is a bit of a loose qualifier here. Gidim Nergal is the only type of Daemon that cannot cast spells at all. The Daemon skill is for combat techniques, not spells.
What are combat techniques? They’re similar to spells, but they don’t cost mana; they’re fancy swordplay and elaborate footwork, and like magic they’re player-designed from parameters. Usually, they’re skill rolls made to modify your attack, anything from adding extra attacks to lowering your own damage in order to increase your Dodge skill. They need to be prepared in advance and purchased with ability points, but they can use limiting conditions to reduce their difficulty, making them excellent tools for combat strategists.
Nergal daemons are aggressive and warlike, and a shocking number of them demand violence from their hosts. They usually have to be negotiated down from their initial imperatives, and many Nergal hosts become experts.
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Casey took up boxing in order to shut Cassius up.

Instead of casting spells, Nergal hosts use their magical energy to summon spectral weapons. The weapons absorb energy from the host; the more they absorb, the more they respond to the host’s will – they apply a bonus to all techs the host uses. Different weapons behave in different ways, but Gidim Nergal is all about finding the perfect time to use the perfect technique. Some weapons accelerate, building up energy and absorbing mana every turn they’re used. Others slowly dissipate, leaking stored energy out into the air until they’re empty.

Instead of a sample spell, we’ll take a look at a tech:

Ambush Predator

Nergal 32
Blindside (Unaware opponent only)
First Attack (First round only)
Desperation Attack (Sacrifice next turn)
Extra attack (x4)

Ambush Predator is a fairly dramatic example. A beginner character couldn’t manage it; it requires a high Nergal skill and casting stat. But, with the help of the spectral weapon’s tech bonuses, it’s possible for a slightly higher-level character. Pushing the weapon to its limit, lying in wait for an opponent, and giving up the next turn mean that it had better end right away!

Remember to check out the City Limits Kickstarter and to check us out on twitter at @TeamCabalGames for more updates!

Book of Daemons – The Gidim Enki

When I asked my friends about their favorite moments, my old friend Adam and I had similar stories to tell. He had fond memories of a D&D character he’d played who acted as party treasurer; he enjoyed hoarding items, magical or not, and using them to solve problems. I played a similar character in a Silent Hill game we played once, and so we built the Enki daemon – an inventory-based enchanter.

A daemon of the Gidim Enki is often talkative and inquisitive, and they make lively partners, asking many questions and urging their hosts to do many things. A lot of their imperatives revolve around the need for new information, the call to investigate and explore the world; many credit this curiosity for the fact that Enki was the first to wake up. In appearance, they vary, like all daemons, according to the user, but they are often smaller than their host, seeming to perch on the shoulder.

When casting spells, the Enki host, like the MCS-03 operative, casts in advance and sets triggers. These spells, however, are hidden in everyday objects, giving the spell a physical center. As an added bonus, when the host enchants an object they instantly know that object’s recent history, receiving visions, flashes of insight, or other divine inspiration. A good Enki host can choose the right item to carry not only for its enchantment qualities, but also for the information it may impart.

Every possible parameter for an Enki spell has an item quality attached to it; this means that you can only embed spells in items suited to carry them.

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Pictured: A potent spell component

Let’s see what this little guy is good for!

Howling Grenado (8)
Gidim Enki 18
+8 Acidic Damage
Fear 4
(Requires an acidic item)
(Requires that the item have a face)
(Activates when thrown at a target)

When Howling Grenado is cast, there’s not much interesting information besides a vision of me with a Sharpie, but some items will be more interesting, like a person’s lighter being used for a Push spell.

By the way, I’m casting a lot of Fear spells lately, right? Here’s what Fear looks like:

Add Fear (+X)
Quality: A face (An action figure, a portrait)
Duration: Will in rounds if resisted, in minutes otherwise.
Base Range: 6 + Will meters
Base Effect: None
Fear is unique in that the caster sets the DT to add the effect. If the target fails their Resolve, he will not come within X meters of the caster, and the caster gets +X to Intimidate trials.

This is only the second of ten class posts! Stay tuned for more next week, including a sneak peek at alignment in Mod!

Remember to check out the City Limits Kickstarter and to check us out on twitter at @TeamCabalGames for more updates!

So Below – When I Becomes We

Remember to check out the City Limits Kickstarter and to check us out on twitter at @TeamCabalGames for more updates!

Day two of the info posts is all about So Below, City Limits Book Two. Although they take place in the same world, So Below is an urban horror, a game taking place in our own cities with a twisted edge.

No one is quite sure what the Gidim are. They woke and began introducing themselves when the Wellsprings opened, in the form of the daemons. Each daemon introduces itself with its own name and one of the Gidim, so most people believe them to be clans or classes of individual daemons. Others believe the Gidim to be much larger beings, fathomless and ancient, and that the daemons that take up residence in human minds are small facets or tendrils of these creatures.

Every daemon is completely different, as unique as the individual hosting it. They have different faces, shapes, and names, and even two daemons of the same Gidim may have little in common aside from their abilities. They seem to dredge up their appearance and name from the memory of the host; rarely is a daemon completely unfamiliar to its host. They’ve even been known to deliberately take the faces or names of people the host knows.

For the most part, they try to instruct their hosts in the use of their powers, but they also speak of their own imperatives. Daemons have their own goals, and they promise their hosts power in exchange for help, revoking their gifts if the host goes too long without helping them.

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Jeanne, of the Gidim Irkalla, demands that her host donate money to charity. She still helps him cheat at cards.

The imperatives vary wildly. Some are very personal; Cassius, of the Gidim Nergal, demands victory by any means, although when he first woke up he overwhelmed his host with bloodlust. Others are more idealistic; Iris, of the Gidim Ishkur, is trying to find a Wellspring where there is no suffering, a place she calls “Paradise”.

Information on daemons is not widely available from official sources; most of the information a person can find is on the web, where users congregate to share their experiences.

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